Running Thoughts

Commentary on running, technology, and coffee.
Run hard to run easy. Run easy to run hard.
If you only learn and understand one rule with respect to running, this is it.
Avoid mediocrity.

Run hard to run easy. Run easy to run hard.

If you only learn and understand one rule with respect to running, this is it.

Avoid mediocrity.

Strength training for runners.
By strength training, I mean all aspects of core, stability, and strength training.
I’ve been focused on this for over a year and have come to the following conclusion.
Your strength training has to match your running intensity.  It’s not a matter of building strength and then increasing your running (reducing your strength training) as you work towards you peak. 
Rather, you need to match your running intensity with your strength intensity.  After all, you are placing more and more demand on your body. It needs more and more strength and stability.  The two feed on each other.

Strength training for runners.

By strength training, I mean all aspects of core, stability, and strength training.

I’ve been focused on this for over a year and have come to the following conclusion.

Your strength training has to match your running intensity.  It’s not a matter of building strength and then increasing your running (reducing your strength training) as you work towards you peak. 

Rather, you need to match your running intensity with your strength intensity.  After all, you are placing more and more demand on your body. It needs more and more strength and stability.  The two feed on each other.

Periodization is critical in training for running.
It provides a structure within which you can both increase your training intensity and provide for recovery (to absorb your training benefits)
Provides control and perspective to lessen the chance of injury
Helps you mentally deal with the grueling demands of increasing training over many months
By using cycles within cycles, you can plan your increases in intensity and know that you have planned periods to recover while staying on a trajectory that leads to the performance you want.
Without this type of plan, runners continue to try and increase every week — which can lead to burnout and injury.

Periodization is critical in training for running.

  • It provides a structure within which you can both increase your training intensity and provide for recovery (to absorb your training benefits)
  • Provides control and perspective to lessen the chance of injury
  • Helps you mentally deal with the grueling demands of increasing training over many months

By using cycles within cycles, you can plan your increases in intensity and know that you have planned periods to recover while staying on a trajectory that leads to the performance you want.

Without this type of plan, runners continue to try and increase every week — which can lead to burnout and injury.

New runners heel strike

Interesting that the percentage is this high.  But, most importantly, new runners should evaluate their stride and cadence.  Yes, anyone can go out and run; but, run correctly and you’ll improve much more quickly and avoid injury.

Core and strength workouts

This is a great set of core, strength, and stability exercises.  Plenty of ideas here to work into your regular core workout.

Should I stretch before my runs?

I think this about wraps it up:

"The newer data does not support stretching and athletes can better spend that precious time in warm up or strength training to reduce injury."

It has become clear to me after training all my life, and, training particularly hard this past year that, as an amateur athlete, if you truly want to achieve a special level of performance you need to train well, well, well beyond your current level of training.
Just observe the amount and quality of training that professional distance runners commit to.  Just observe other very good amateur athletes on fitness applications like Strava.  You’ll see that the best amateur athletes perform a volume of training that is well beyond yours.
To get to their level does not take weeks or months of training. It takes years.  It requires true commitment and patience.  Continual dedication to finding ways to improve your performance.  For no matter how good you become, there is someone that has trained harder, longer, better.  
So, it is really not about comparing yourself to others, ultimately it is all about what you can do.  There truly is no limit if you commit yourself, if you challenge yourself.  But it all begins with awareness.  Awareness of what it takes. Awareness of how you improve. Awareness that if you do the work, the results will follow.

It has become clear to me after training all my life, and, training particularly hard this past year that, as an amateur athlete, if you truly want to achieve a special level of performance you need to train well, well, well beyond your current level of training.

Just observe the amount and quality of training that professional distance runners commit to.  Just observe other very good amateur athletes on fitness applications like Strava.  You’ll see that the best amateur athletes perform a volume of training that is well beyond yours.

To get to their level does not take weeks or months of training. It takes years.  It requires true commitment and patience.  Continual dedication to finding ways to improve your performance.  For no matter how good you become, there is someone that has trained harder, longer, better.  

So, it is really not about comparing yourself to others, ultimately it is all about what you can do.  There truly is no limit if you commit yourself, if you challenge yourself.  But it all begins with awareness.  Awareness of what it takes. Awareness of how you improve. Awareness that if you do the work, the results will follow.

Running: Intervals - breakdowns

Interval breakdowns are a great, easy way to incorporate intervals into your training.  Also, because they are descending, they are more fun and invigorating.

Simple technique. Pick a starting distance and then reduce the distance with each interval. For example, 400 meters, 300 meters, 200 meters.  Short break between each interval. Repeat several times. 

More distance related? Start at a longer distance e.g. 800 or 600.

Want more speed? Start at a shorter distance e.g. 300 and descend to 200, 100.

Running: When damage is a good thing

Running Times article. Great points about letting the body naturally process the stress that you put it through with running.

Agree with this in general. For example, I never take fluids with me on runs, even long runs.  Pretty much never take any anti-inflammatories or anything else after runs — other than re-hydrating properly.